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Family Album

Table of Contents
Changes in iPhoto '09
Summary of Outside Layouts
Summary of Inside Layouts
Backgrounds
Cover Examples
One-photo Layout Examples
Two-photo Layout Examples
Three-photo Layout Examples
Four-photo Layout Examples
Six-photo Layout Examples
Earlier versions

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The Family Album theme is characterized by old-fashioned pseudo-frames of various types on either an ivory or olive green textured background. The layouts vary considerably depending on the original orientation of the photos that you place, even determining which sort of frame will be used. The Copperville font is used for the cover while Baskerville is used inside. Most layouts have a version that allows captions. There is an Introduction page with a vignetted frame, and then one-, two-, three-, four-, and six-photo layouts, as well as a map and blank page. There are multiple variations for the Cover.

Changes in iPhoto '09

The only change in the iPhoto '09 version of the Family Album layout that I can see is the addition of maps pages. In contrast with the other layouts, no new introduction pages have been added.

Summary of Outside Layouts

Summary of Inside Layouts

Backgrounds

The Family Album theme has an ivory or olive green pseudo-textured background for the outside and adds the Photo Background (formerly Palm Tree) to let you use any image you want for the background of the inside pages.

Cover Examples

There is a full-bleed one-photo layout (not shown).

The one-photo cover shows the caption below for horizontal photos and to the right with vertically-oriented photos:

With three photos, regardless of their original orientation, you'll always get a big one to the left and two smaller stacked photos to the right.

The four-photo cover has four rigid frames that don't change with the orientation of your photos. The upper-left and bottom-right have faux corners, the others have an embossed border.

One-photo Layout Examples

There are a lot of one-photo layouts and they change dramatically depending on the original orientation of your photo. I won't talk about the full-bleed layout, but it does exist. Instead, I'll start with Layout 2, which offers old-fashioned pseudo-frames. If you choose a vertical photo, you get corners tucked under the page and a little design at the bottom of the frame. If you have a horizontal photo, you get classic dark olive green photo corners. (The color of the photo corners does not change if you change the background color.)

If you really want a particular kind of frame, one solution would be to crop your photo into the proper orientation.

With Layout 4, you can choose from a frayed, antiqued edge for vertical photos and a white scalloped edge for horizontal photos. Layout 5 reduces the size (but not the shape or design) and adds a caption. Again, if you really want a particular frame, you can crop your photo into the proper orientation.

Layouts 6 and 7 offer that strange mosaic effect. I'm not going to bother showing it to you again.

Layouts 8 and 9 display photos in a vertically-oriented matted frame (regardless of your photo's original orientation), either alone or with a caption to the right, respectively.

Two-photo Layout Examples

The first two two-photo layouts show horizontal photos with classic photo corners and vertical photos with tucked in corners. Use Layout 2 to make the photos slightly smaller and add a caption.

With Layouts 3 and 4, your frames are determined by the original orientation of your photos and what sorts of photos they're combined with!

So, if you have two horizontal photos, you get a scalloped photo on the upper left and a plain photo in the bottom-right. If you have two vertical photos, you get a frayed photo on the left and an old, matted photo on the right.

If you have two differently-oriented photos, you'll get the vertical one in a frayed frame and the horizontal one in a scalloped frame. Curiously, if you put the vertical one on the right side of the page, it'll be slightly larger than if you put it on the left side of the page.

Finally, the last two-photo layout is the same as Layout 3, but with captions -- and slightly smaller photos:

Three-photo Layout Examples

There are two sets of three-photo layouts. The first layout offers a large photo at left with two smaller ones stacked on the right. If the large photo is horizontal, it gets photo corners; if it's vertical, its corners are pseudo-tucked under the paper. The stacked photos are slightly larger next to vertical photos (since there's more room), and always have embossed frames of the same color as the background:

The second layout is very similar, with slightly smaller photos and captions:

The third layout shows photos with different frames at various angles. In general, you get one large frame on the left and two smaller stacked frames on the right. The kind of frame you get is determined by the original orientation of the photo and also its location on the page. So if the large photo is horizontal, it gets a simple frame; if it is vertical, it gets an old-fashioned frame. If the upper smaller photo is horizontal, it gets a scalloped frame; if it is vertical, it gets frayed edges. If the lower smaller photo is horizontal it gets a simple frame; if it is vertical it gets an old-fashioned one.

The last layout is virtually the same as Layout 3, but with text and slightly smaller photos:

Four-photo Layout Examples

The first two four-photo layouts are extremely simple to maneuver in comparison with the previous ones. They have four rigid horizontal frames, two with corners and two without. The frames stay horizontal regardless of the original orientation of your photos:

The last two four-photo layouts are equally simple. You get four frames that change orientation depending on the orientation of your photos, but the overall design stays pretty much the same. The photos in the upper-left and lower-right get simple frames, regardless of orientation, and the photos in the upper-right and lower-left get scallops, also regardless of their orientation.

Layout 4 adds a caption and slightly reduces the size of the photos but is otherwise identical.

Six-photo Layout Examples

If the four-photo layouts are simple, the six-photo ones are even more so.

The six-photo layout offers three rows of embossed frames (of the same color as the background). Each row has two stacked photos, one horizontal and one vertical, whose order alternates from one row to the next. The frames do not change; photos are cropped to fit as necessary. The second layout is identical to the first, except for the caption and slightly smaller photos.

Earlier Versions

Here's my description of the Family Album theme in iPhoto '08.


If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, I'd love to hear them.


Copyright 2007 by Elizabeth Castro. Please don't copy this page. Instead, link to it!

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Page last modified on January 28, 2010, at 03:22 PM EST

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